We posted recently about GINA’s prohibiting an employer from “actively” listening to conversations between colleagues in which they discuss their genetic information, including family medical history, and how it will limit an employer’s internet searches of applicants and employees. Add casual conversations, sometimes referred to as "water cooler" conversation, to the list of workplace activities curtailed by GINA.

The U.S. Department of Labor issued today an Administrator’s Interpretation of the FMLA Regulation defining "in loco parentis" relationships as part of the FMLA’s definition of "son" or "daughter".  Is this "big news" and, if so, why?  

One could always argue that individuals standing ‘in loco parentis" to a child covered under the FMLA could take FMLA leave for the birth or