Photo of Patricia Anderson Pryor

Patricia Anderson Pryor is a Principal and Litigation Manager of the Cincinnati, Ohio, office of Jackson Lewis P.C. She is an experienced litigator in both state and federal courts, representing and defending employers in nearly every form of employment litigation, including class actions.

Ms. Pryor represents and advises employers in federal and state administrative proceedings, in all forms of dispute resolution, including mediation and arbitration, and in managing all aspects of the employment relationship. She has represented employers before the EEOC, the DOL, the DOJ, the OFCCP, and the NLRB, in addition to various state agencies.

Ms. Pryor also works with employers to avoid litigation by developing effective policies and practices, including harassment policies, social media policies, FMLA practices, attendance programs, affirmative action programs and wellness plans. She conducts proactive wage and hour audits, harassment investigations and compensation/pay equity reviews.

She is a frequent speaker at legal seminars and to employers and professional groups and provides training to managers and human resource professionals on a wide variety of employment and legal issues, including wage and hour issues, harassment, disability, the Family and Medical Leave Act, pay equity and affirmative action obligations. She has been featured on the radio program “Employment Straight Talk” and has published a number of employment law articles.

While attending law school, Ms. Pryor was a member of the editorial board of the University of Cincinnati Law Review.

Learn more about Ms. Pryor on the Jackson Lewis website.

Massachusetts says yes!

An amendment to the Massachusetts Fair Employment Practices Act requires employers to accommodate pregnant workers.

According to the law, some accommodations that may be necessary for pregnant workers, include:

  • more frequent or longer breaks;
  • time off;
  • acquisition or modification of equipment or seating;
  • temporary transfers;
  • job restructuring;
  • light duty;
  • private non-bathroom space

supreme courtIn case your news and twitter accounts are down, and you otherwise have not heard the news…   President Trump has nominated Judge Gorsuch from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit to fill Justice Antonin Scalia’s vacant Supreme Court seat.  There are surely countless articles about his nomination hitting the airwaves even as I type this, but for employers who struggle with leave management issues, a quick review of the Hwang v. Kansas State University decision, authored by Judge Gorsuch, may provide employers with hope that leave management law could move in the right direction. 
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On the eve of the end of its fiscal year, the U.S. Department of Labor has announced final rules implementing Executive Order 13706 requiring that covered federal contractors provide paid sick leave for covered employees.

Scheduled for official publication tomorrow in the federal register, the rules require federal contractors to provide at least 1 hour

We have been reporting on the growing patchwork of paid sick leave laws now for over 3 years.  The patchwork continues to fill in heavily on the west coast with state laws in both California and Oregon and 10 city ordinances scattered across California, Oregon and Washington.  This summer Los Angeles and San Diego added

With today’s publication of the final guidance and regulations implementing the “Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces” Executive Order (also known as the “Blacklisting” or “Bad Actors” Executive Order), mistakes that violate the FMLA or ADA (along with many other employment laws) could block an employer from lucrative federal contracts or subcontracts.  Federal contractors and those

A nursing home has settled claims of systemic violations of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) brought by the EEOC by agreeing to pay $370,000, the EEOC has announced.  In EEOC v. Founders Pavilion, Inc. (W.D.N.Y., filed May 16, 2013), the EEOC had alleged that the employer violated GINA when the doctor to whom