“What did I do wrong?” and “Am I doing this correctly” are frequent questions from clients regarding FMLA administration. This is the 25th blog in this series, which digs into the FMLA regulations and related issues to address discrete mis-steps that can result in legal liability.

Delaying designation of FMLA-qualifying leave or designating more than

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court upheld the Pittsburgh Paid Sick Days Act (“PSDA”) in a decision today, overturning two lower court decisions that found the Act was invalid as an impermissible business regulation.

Under the PSDA, employers with 15+ employees must provide paid sick leave, up to 40 hours per year, at a rate of 1

Beginning January 1, 2020, Oregon employers with at least six employees must comply with the Employer Accommodation for Pregnancy Act. The Act requires employers to provide reasonable accommodations to applicants and employees who have limitations related to pregnancy, unless it would impose an undue hardship on the employer.  The Act also makes it unlawful to

“What did I do wrong?” and “Am I doing this correctly” are frequent questions from clients regarding FMLA administration. This is the 23rd blog in this series, which digs into the FMLA regulations to address discrete mis-steps that can result in legal liability.

Not understanding all of the reasons an employee can take FMLA

Last week Governor Bevin signed Senate Bill 18, the Kentucky Pregnant Workers Act. The Act amends the Kentucky Civil Rights Act (KCRA) and applies to employers with 15 or more employees within the state in each of twenty (20) or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year, as well as any agent

Westchester County has released a model Notice of Employee Rights for the Westchester County Earned Sick Leave Law (“WCESLL”), effective April 10, 2019.

According to FAQ’s released simultaneously, starting on April 10, 2019, employers must begin providing eligible new hires with a copy of the law and written notice, which is intended to explain how

The Fourth Circuit has reaffirmed its position that regular and reliable attendance is an essential function of most jobs.  The Court held that an employer did not violate the Rehabilitation Act by taking adverse action against an employee because of her attendance issues—even though they were caused by her mental illness.  Hannah P. v. Coats