In October 2016, AARP sued the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) under the Administrative Procedures Act (“APA”) arguing that there was no explanation for the shift in the EEOC’s position relating to what makes participation in a wellness program “voluntary”.  Originally, the EEOC argued that in order for a wellness program to be “voluntary,” employers

The days of referring to the EEOC’s guidance on wellness incentives under the ADA and GINA as “long-awaited” may be coming to an end.   The EEOC announced that it has sent a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on this issue to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for clearance.

The NPRM is not available

After staying on the litigation sidelines for years while the popularity of workplace wellness programs skyrocketed, the EEOC has brought its third lawsuit in about two months, alleging that the employer’s wellness program was not “voluntary” due to the “large” and “substantial” penalties to those who chose not to participate. Because the program was involuntary,

After staying on the litigation sidelines for years while the popularity of workplace wellness programs skyrocketed, the EEOC has brought a second lawsuit just six weeks after its first, alleging that the employer’s wellness program was not “voluntary” due to the “dire consequences” to non- participants. Because the program was involuntary, the disability related inquiries

The EEOC passed yet again on the opportunity to provide guidance on the meaning of “voluntary” under the ADA as it applies to wellness plans. Guidance would be helpful because the ADA, the EEOC regulations, and the EEOC’s Interpretive and Enforcement Guidance permit employers to conduct voluntary medical examinations, including voluntary medical histories, as part of

The class action wave seems to have come ashore for employers using financial incentives to drive participation in wellness programs. Leveraging the uncertain legal environment we have discussed previously, a federal district court in Florida granted class certification to current and former employees charged a $20 bi-weekly surcharge for not participating in a “voluntary” wellness program requiring biometric testing (finger stick for glucose and cholesterol) and completion of an online health risk assessment.
Continue Reading Class Certification Granted In ADA Challenge to Wellness Program