The EEOC has brought a class action under the Genetic Information and Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) against a nursing and rehabilitation center, alleging that the defendant-employer "requires a class of applicants and employees to provide genetic information in response to questions about family medical history" as part of its pre-employment, return-to-work and annual medical exams of

The EEOC reported a record number of private sector discrimination charges filed in FY 2010, nearly reaching the 100,000 mark.  99,922 charges were filed in FY 2010, an increase of 6,645 (7%) from FY 2009. The most frequently filed charges were retaliation (36%), race discrimination (35.9%), and sex discrimination (29.1%).

Disability discrimination charges increased more

We posted recently about GINA’s prohibiting an employer from “actively” listening to conversations between colleagues in which they discuss their genetic information, including family medical history, and how it will limit an employer’s internet searches of applicants and employees. Add casual conversations, sometimes referred to as "water cooler" conversation, to the list of workplace activities curtailed by GINA.

Title II of GINA prohibits the use of genetic information in employment, restricts employers from requesting, requiring or purchasing genetic information, and limits employers from disclosing genetic information. We posted recently that, according to the EEOC’s newly-issued regulations, an employer who engages in certain internet searches has illegally requested genetic information.

An employer