Paid family and medical leave

Beginning on January 1, 2023, the Washington Paid Family & Medical Leave Program’s “total premium” rate rose to 0.8% from 0.6%.  This rate is recalculated annually in October, based on contributions from premiums and benefits paid during the previous year. 

As was true in previous years, employers must report to the Washington Employment Security Department

Starting January 1, 2023, Colorado employers must comply with Colorado’s Family and Medical Leave Insurance (FAMLI) Act, which requires nearly all employers and all employees to contribute to the state’s paid family and medical leave program.

FAMLI Benefits for Colorado Employees

Colorado’s FAMLI program will provide Colorado employees with up to twelve weeks of paid

The Paid Leave Oregon program commences on January 1, 2023. As an initial step, most Oregon employers must alert employees about the program and begin paying into the state insurance plan. The law requires employers post the Oregon Employment Department’s model notice at the worksite and distribute the same notice to remote workers.

Additionally, for

A provision in the enacted state budget for fiscal year 2023 would have amended the Massachusetts Paid Family and Medical Leave Act (PFMLA) to provide employers and employees more flexibility to use other accrued benefits to supplement paid benefits received from the state. The governor initially returned the legislation to the legislature with a recommendation,

The Washington Employment Security Department has amended the “waiting period” regulation, WAC 192-500-185, for certain employees who successfully apply to the state’s Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML) Program.

Under Washington’s PFML, the “waiting period” falls during the first seven consecutive calendar days beginning with the Sunday of the first week that an eligible

Both Maryland and Virginia have joined the District of Columbia in enacting laws relating to paid family and medical leave for private-sector workers.

Following in the footsteps of the District of Columbia, the Maryland law will create a mandatory statewide benefit that will be funded by payroll taxes. In contrast, the Virginia law will create

The Washington State Legislature has again amended the state’s Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML) Act.  This amendment is effective June 9, 2022.  Here is a list of the most significant changes to the law:

  • First six weeks of postnatal leave for incapacitated employee is presumptively medical leave. During the six-week postnatal period, any